How to pitch

The majority of content at Nature Reviews Psychology is invited by the editors. But, we are open to (and welcome!) unsolicited proposals. Here are some tips for writing a great pitch.

Like Comment

Nature Reviews Psychology will publish around 50 papers per year, the majority of which are commissioned by the editors based on trends we're noticing in the published literature, recent conference presentations we've seen, and (my favorite) conversations with researchers about what they are excited about in their field.

However, if you have an idea for a paper, we'd love to hear from you...via a proposal submitted using our online system. (Please don't email us about potential articles -- we cannot provide feedback on ideas sent to us by email, and our response will be to ask you to submit through the system).

Your proposal pitch should present concise yet convincing arguments that make us excited about your idea and the potential paper (without overselling it).

Your proposal should explain:

Why this topic? Are recent findings opening up a new field? Will the Review offer insight into/new angle on an existing area? Are you bringing together established areas of research in a new way? If there are other recent reviews on a similar topic, you should explain how your idea is different.

Why now? Why is the piece timely? Why now and not two years ago or in two years’ time? If this is a new topic, are there enough published papers to support a Review? If this is an established topic, is there enough active research that the Review will be useful to the field? Highlight recent papers (or conference symposia, meetings, funding calls, etc.) that demonstrate the timeliness of the topic.

Why you? Do you have an established research background in the field? What new angle are you bringing? If you are a team of authors how do you complement each other? We aim to present a diverse range of voices in the journal, so don't just tell us how famous you and/or your coauthors are; explain how you are qualified to write on the topic, and the unique viewpoint you can bring to it.

Why us? Why do you want to write for Nature Reviews Psychology and not another journal? Think about the audience for your paper (who do you want to read it?) and the audience of the journal. Remember that we aim to publish papers that are authoritative to experts in an area but of interest and accessible to non-experts across the broader psychology community.

Because we are very interventionist at Nature Reviews, our preference is for proposal pitches, not completed drafts -- it is easier for us to provide feedback to help shape a piece so it is a good fit for the journal before a first draft has been written (you can read more about our synopsis stage here). Of course, if you already have a draft, please do include it.

TL;DR: If you have an idea for an article, submit a proposal pitch via our online system that motivates why this topic, why now, why you, and why us.

Jenn Richler

Chief Editor, Nature Reviews Psychology

Jenn completed her PhD at Vanderbilt University where her research focused on face and object perception and recognition, learning, attention, and memory. She continued at Vanderbilt as a post-doctoral research associate, during which time she also served as an Associate Editor for Journal of Experimental: Psychology: General and a writer for the American Psychological Association. Jenn joined Nature Climate Change and Nature Energy in 2016 as a Senior Editor handling manuscripts that spanned the behavioral and social sciences. Jenn returned to her psychology roots as the launch Chief Editor of Nature Reviews Psychology in 2021.